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Benco, Amann Girrbach Announce Partnership

Posted on June 29, 2015

PITTSTON, PA — Benco Dental, the nation’s fastest growing privately owned dental distribution company, announced a distribution partnership agreement with Amann Girrbach, a pioneer in dental CAD/CAM technology and one of the leading innovators and preferred full-service providers in digital dental prosthetics. While the companies have enjoyed success for years, they agree that a combined focus and alignment of synergies allow for one of the best offerings available to the market, and just at the right time.

“In meetings over the past several months, we have realized that we have the right people in both organizations, with the right expertise, to deliver a robust set of open solutions to our diverse customer base,” said Paul Jackson, VP of Marketing for Benco Dental. “Our agreement with Amann Girrbach affords both companies the chance to meet the needs of the dentist and the lab with leading edge equipment and materials.”

“I’m thrilled about the Benco Dental and Amann Girrbach partnership,” said Marco Ratz, CEO Amann Girrbach. “Benco Dental and Amann Girrbach have been in discussions for quite some time. Both companies have grown and evolved at such an accelerated rate in the past few years and we feel now is the perfect opportunity to focus our combined energies on delivering the right set of solutions to the market. The technology is ever-changing and we have seen a shift in the market; we are well equipped to mutually support it.”

Amann Girrbach has proven itself to be a global leader and innovator of CAD/CAM equipment, materials and technology. Benco Dental has enjoyed 84 years of success in the U.S. market because of a commitment to deliver best-in-class products and solutions to a diverse customer base.

“When reviewing solutions to offer to our customers and prospects, we feel that Amann Girrbach, with their open architecture, truly allows for a seamless integration of digital function for doctors. Not only that, but no matter the size of the lab, we are confident that Amann Girrbach’s full product line is uniquely suited to any need or sophistication,” said Mark Nelson, CAD/CAM Product Manager at Benco Dental.

“We realize that supporting the US market is about more than just providing a full line of integrated solutions to our customers and prospects – it is about relationships, service, and continuous dialogue with our customers to continue to innovate to meet demand. We are fortunate to have a greater reach to the voice of the customer through our distribution partners. Their feedback continues to fuel the innovation of our R&D team in Koblach, Austria – one of the largest in the industry – and we are excited to continue to innovate and deliver solutions to the market,” said Kat Dunham, Director of Operations and Service at Amann Girrbach America Inc.







Survey: Denture Wearers Feel Limited

Posted on June 26, 2015

PARSIPPANY, N.J. (PRNewswire) - Denture wearers are misunderstood, and they're anything but a stereotype. The Biting Into Denture Care survey shows that the biggest misconception about dentures is that they're only for grandma and grandpa (59%). The truth tells a different story: more than half (53%) of respondents were 44-year- old or younger when they first got dentures. The findings reveal intimate behaviors and attitudes about denture wearers and how they care for their oral health.

Conducted by Survata, and commissioned by GSK Consumer Healthcare's Polident® Denture Cleanser and Super Poligrip® Denture Adhesive, the new survey illustrates how denture wearers have a complex relationship with food, and more.  Denture wearers also balk at romance, feel some limitations on their careers, and have kept their dentures a secret from coworkers and loved ones. 

"It is clear from these survey findings that denture wearers' relationship with dentures is complicated," said Joe Buttermore, Senior Brand Manager for Polident® and Super Poligrip® brands. "While dentures give their wearers confidence and freedom, they can also make them feel careful and cautious. We see a need  to make a positive shift to people's belief systems about wearing dentures. We want to help liberate denture wearers from limitations so that they can really dive into life, find uninhibited joy in everything and seize life's opportunities to sing louder, laugh harder, get closer, and eat foods they enjoy spontaneously.

When asked if wearing dentures limits their ability to live life to the fullest, 34 percent of survey respondents said they agree with that sentiment. Further, the survey explored some reasons why.

Pucker up or shy away? Many denture wearers feel hesitant about getting close to a loved one.

When it comes to love, romance is at stake for denture wearers. Whether they're concerned about bad breath or even fear of their dentures dislodging, nearly three in five (56%) survey respondents say that wearing dentures impacts their love life, of which 42 percent admit the effect was negative.

This impact is also felt in the way they kiss. Of the denture wearers who confess that wearing dentures affects the way they kiss, about a quarter (24%) are afraid to kiss someone passionately. What's more, men (23%) are more worried about kissing with their dentures than women (19%).

Denture wearers are intimidated by social situations and certain foods.

Imagine trying to hide a part of you from someone you love. The Biting Into Denture Care survey shows that 63 percent of denture wearers have kept their dentures a secret from someone, including friends (32%), their sibling(s) (10%), and even their spouse (7%).

Furthermore, some denture wearers even avoid certain social situations such as eating at parties or weddings (10%). And some are afraid to smile (20%).

They also have a complex relationship with food. The No. 1 concern for more than half of denture wearers (54%) is getting food stuck in or under their dentures. As a result, they tend to avoid eating certain foods, such as corn on the cob (50%), apples (34%), nuts (33%), steak (23%), and some beverages that may stain teeth, such as coffee or wine (8%).[12]

Denture wearers lack confidence at work.

Barriers to keep denture wearers from living life to the fullest also invade the workplace. Nearly two in five (38%) denture wearers admit that wearing dentures has affected their career. These respondents admit that they often feel intimidated to network with other professionals (37%) and lack confidence in meetings (33%). Nearly a quarter have even avoided going on job interviews (23%).

Denture wearers believe they keep their dentures in pristine condition.

Oral health ranks second highest (after overall physical well-being) among denture wearers in their list of priorities. More than three-quarters of the denture wearers surveyed (78%) feel they take excellent or good care of their dentures. But by contrast, research shows that up to 89 percent of denture wearers are not cleaning their dentures correctly.

"Proper care of dentures and having the confidence to overcome denture-related inhibitions, is essential to oral health and well-being," said Frank Gonser, DDS, PhD, North America Oral Care Medical Director for GSK Consumer Healthcare. "And, the one in five adults in the U.S. who wear dentures can be younger than you think. As our population gets older, dentures will be an even more important topic in the future because it affects a large number of people in society."

Real stories of denture wearers and more information about, Polident® and Super Poligrip® are available on the brands' YouTube channel and website, MyDentureCare.com.

Super Poligrip® Denture Adhesive and the No. 1 dentist recommended Polident® Denture Cleanser provide solutions to help denture wearers overcome their fears and inhibitions and build their confidence with the strong, all-day hold of Super Poligrip® Denture Adhesive, and the cleaning and odor-causing bacteria-killing power of Polident®.  

About the Survey

The national survey was conducted by Survata, an independent research firm, between May 22 and May 28, 2015. Survata interviewed 500 online respondents of adults who wear denture wearers during the poll. 







New Survey Reveals Over Half of Denture Wearers Avoid Eating Certain Foods

Posted on June 26, 2015

PARSIPPANY, N.J., June 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Denture wearers are misunderstood, and they're anything but a stereotype. The Biting Into Denture Care survey shows that the biggest misconception about dentures is that they're only for grandma and grandpa (59%).The truth tells a different story: more than half (53%) of respondents were 44-year- old or younger when they first got dentures. The findings reveal intimate behaviors and attitudes about denture wearers and how they care for their oral health.

Conducted by Survata, and commissioned by GSK Consumer Healthcare's Polident® Denture Cleanser and Super Poligrip® Denture Adhesive, the new survey illustrates how denture wearers have a complex relationship with food, and more.  Denture wearers also balk at romance, , feel some limitations on their careers and have kept their dentures a secret from coworkers and loved ones. 

"It is clear from these survey findings that denture wearers' relationship with dentures is complicated," said Joe Buttermore, Senior Brand Manager for Polident® and Super Poligrip® brands. "While dentures give their wearers confidence and freedom, they can also make them feel careful and cautious. We see a need to make a positive shift to people's belief systems about wearing dentures.  We want to help liberate denture wearers from limitations so that they can really dive into life, find uninhibited joy in everything and seize life's opportunities to sing louder, laugh harder, get closer, and eat foods they enjoy spontaneously.

When asked if wearing dentures limits their ability to live life to the fullest, 34 percent of survey respondents said they agree with that sentiment. Further, the survey explored some reasons why.

Pucker up or shy away? Many denture wearers feel hesitant about getting close to a loved one.

When it comes to love, romance is at stake for denture wearers. Whether they're concerned about bad breath or even fear of their dentures dislodging, nearly three in five (56%) of survey respondents say that wearing dentures impacts their love life, of which 42 percent admit the effect was negative.

This impact is also felt in the way they kiss. Of the denture wearers who confess that wearing dentures affects the way they kiss, about a quarter (24%) are afraid to kiss someone passionately. What's more, men (23%) are more worried about kissing with their dentures than women (19%).

Denture wearers are intimidated by social situations and certain foods.

Imagine trying to hide a part of you from someone you love. The Biting Into Denture Care survey shows that 63 percent of denture wearers have kept their dentures a secret from someone, including friends (32%), their sibling(s) (10%) and even their spouse (7%).

Furthermore, some denture wearers even avoid certain social situations like eating at parties or weddings (10%).And some are afraid to smile (20%).

They also have a complex relationship with food. The number one concern for more than half of denture wearers (54%) is getting food stuck in or under their dentures.  As a result, they tend to avoid eating certain foods, like corn on the cob (50%), apples (34%), nuts (33%), steak (23%), and some beverages that may stain teeth, like coffee or wine (8%).

Denture wearers lack confidence at work.

Barriers to keep denture wearers from living life to the fullest also invade the workplace. Nearly two in five (38%) denture wearers admit that wearing dentures has affected their career. These respondents admit that they often feel intimidated to network with other professionals (37%) and lack confidence in meetings (33%). Nearly a quarter have even avoided going on job interviews (23%).

Denture wearers believe they keep their dentures in pristine condition.

Oral health ranks second highest (after overall physical well-being) among denture wearers in their list of priorities. More than three-quarters of the denture wearers surveyed (78%) feel they take excellent or good care of their dentures. But by contrast, research shows that up to 89 percent of denture wearers are not cleaning their dentures correctly.

"Proper care of dentures and having the confidence to overcome denture-related inhibitions, is essential to oral health and well-being," said Frank Gonser, DDS, PhD, North America Oral Care Medical Director for GSK Consumer Healthcare. "And, the one in five adults in the U.S. who wear dentures can be younger than you think. As our population gets older, dentures will be an even more important topic in the future because it affects a large number of people in society."

Real stories of denture wearers and more information about, Polident® and Super Poligrip® are available on the brands' YouTube channel and website, MyDentureCare.com.

Super Poligrip® Denture Adhesive and the #1 dentist recommended Polident® Denture Cleanser provide solutions to help denture wearers overcome their fears and inhibitions and build their confidence with the strong, all-day hold of Super Poligrip® Denture Adhesive, and the cleaning and odor-causing bacteria-killing power of Polident®.  

About the Survey

The national survey was conducted by Survata, an independent research firm, between May 22 and May 28, 2015. Survata interviewed 500 online respondents of adults who wear denture wearers during the poll. 

About GSK Consumer Healthcare

GSK Consumer Healthcare is one of the world's largest consumer healthcare companies.  Our purpose is to help more people around the world to do more, feel better and live longer with everyday healthcare products.  We have a heritage that goes back over 160 years.  We own some of the world's best loved healthcare brands, including Sensodyne®, Theraflu®, Excedrin®, Nicorette® and NicoDerm®CQ®, Flonase®, and TUMS®. These brands are successful in over 100 countries around the world because they all show our passion for quality, guaranteed by science. They are inspired by the real wants and needs of the millions of people who walk into pharmacies, supermarkets, market stalls and go on-line all over the world every day, and choose us first.

Our goal is to build a global, growing business we call a Fast Moving Consumer Healthcare (FMCH) company, dedicated to everyday healthcare with all of the scientific expertise and quality guarantees that demands, working at the speed and with the genuine consumer understanding the modern world expects.

 







Research Predicts 39% Drop in Lab Numbers

Posted on June 25, 2015

Tallahassee, Fla. - Dental patients might have less access to high-quality dental restorations in the near future. The National Association of Dental Laboratories (NADL) predicts, based on recent market research compiled by Valmont Research and the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, that from 2006-2017 the number of dental laboratories in the US will be reduced by 39 percent.

As the number of dental laboratories in the US continues to shrink, dentists will have fewer domestic options when deciding where to supply their patients’ dental restorations. Already, many dentists are using dental restorations produced in other countries.

“Everyday Americans depend on dentists to place long-lasting to permanent dental restorations without any knowledge of where or how that restoration was produced,” says Gary Iocco, co-chair of the NADL Public Awareness Committee. “Dental patients should have trust in their dentist, but they should also be an informed consumer.”

Although most patients never see dental laboratories, the quality of dental restorations could severely impact patients’ health. Patients should hold dental laboratories to the same standard of cleanliness and professionalism that they expect from their dentists.

“Unfortunately, questioning the man or woman in the white coat intimidates many dental patients,” Iocco says. “However, resources are available for patients who want to protect their health.”

NADL is promoting transparency in dentistry and the role and value of trained dental technicians by promoting public awareness of these issues that affect many dental patients. In order to spread the word about the need for standards, NADL has launched the “What’s in Your Mouth?” campaign to provide dental consumers, dentists, and the dental laboratory community with the knowledge they need to make important purchasing decisions.

“What’s in Your Mouth?” encourages patients to assess the quality of their restorations by asking their dentist these 5 basic questions:

1. “What are the qualifications of the dental technician who will create my restoration? Is he or she a Certified Dental Technician?” 

2. “Is the laboratory you work with certified and by whom?” 

3. “Where is your dental laboratory located?” 

4. “What patient contact materials are in the restorations you are prescribing for the treatment plan?” 

5. “How does your dental practice ensure that it is not using misbranded or grey market dental materials?”

For information on the campaign, please visit our website: http://whatsinyourmouth.us/.







Burkhart Dental to Distribute the Full Range of IDS Implants, Implant-related Products

Posted on June 25, 2015

Integrated dental systems (ids) of Englewood Cliffs, NJ, and Burkhart Dental Supply of Tacoma, WA, announced today that Burkhart Dental will distribute the full range of ids tooth replacement products. Included in the offerings: MegaGen AnyRidge Implants, MegaGen AnyOne Implants, Reflect Rapid Implants, Reflect Tapered Screw Implants, Smart Dentin Grinder, AnyWhere Implant Provisional System and Dental Master patient education and case acceptance software. 

“We are very excited to have Burkhart Dental as a distribution partner and to provide them a full range of implants and related products to allow us to participate in the largest and fastest-growing dental product market,” said Carey Lyons, ceo of ids. “We are providing extensive educational resources and training for the entire Burkhart sales team as well as a nationwide field team of ids Implant and Surgical Sales Specialists to support their efforts.” 

Lyons added, “Our tooth replacement systems offers dentists immediate loading for faster treatment time, as well as systems for all indications that do not require learning new techniques and that are more economical. Hands-on courses and full service from dental supply dealers like Burkhart add benefit to the offerings.” 

“We are thrilled to provide our sales associates a complete and feature-rich range of implants and implant-related products from ids,” said Lori Isbell, Burkhart's president and ceo. “Our team understands the opportunity and has been training with ids and their key opinion leaders to offer innovative tooth replacement solutions to dental professionals to better serve their patients.”

For more information about ids and their complete range of implants visit www.idsimplants.com

Source: Burkhart Dental

 







Impending Reduction of Dental Laboratories Could Impact Dental Patients

Posted on June 25, 2015

Tallahassee, Fla. (PRWEB) 

Dental patients might have less access to high-quality dental restorations in the near future. It is predicted that from 2006-2017 the number of dental laboratories in the U.S. will be reduced by 39 percent, according to National Association of Dental Laboratories' (NADL) recent market research compiled by Valmont Research and the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

As the number of dental laboratories in the U.S. continues to shrink, dentists will have fewer domestic options when deciding where to supply their patients’ dental restorations. Already, many dentists are using dental restorations produced in other countries.

“Everyday Americans depend on dentists to place long-lasting to permanent dental restorations without any knowledge of where or how that restoration was produced,” said Gary Iocco, co-chair of the NADL Public Awareness Committee. “Dental patients should have trust in their dentist, but they should also be an informed consumer.”

Although most patients never see dental laboratories, the quality of dental restorations could severely impact patients’ health. Patients should hold dental laboratories to the same standard of cleanliness and professionalism that they expect from their dentists.

“Unfortunately, questioning the man or woman in the white coat intimidates many dental patients,” said Iocco. “However, resources are available for patients who want to protect their health.”

NADL is promoting transparency in dentistry and the role and value of trained dental technicians by promoting public awareness of these issues which affect many dental patients. In order to spread the word about the need for standards, NADL has launched the “What’s in Your Mouth?” campaign to provide dental consumers, dentists and the dental laboratory community with the knowledge they need to make important purchasing decisions.

“What’s in Your Mouth?” encourages patients to assess the quality of their restorations by asking their dentist these five basic questions:

1.    “What are the qualifications of the dental technician that will create my restoration? Are they a Certified Dental Technician?” 

2.    “Is the laboratory you work with certified and by whom?” 

3.    “Where is your dental laboratory located?” 

4.    “What patient contact materials are in the restorations you are prescribing for the treatment plan?” 

5.    “How does your dental practice ensure that it is not using misbranded or grey market dental materials?”

For information on the campaign, please visit our website: http://whatsinyourmouth.us/.







Consumer Reports: Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs The Health Crisis Of This Generation

Posted on June 25, 2015

YONKERS, N.Y.June 25, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Decades of inaction to curb the overuse of life-saving antibiotics by physicians, dentists, patients, and farmers has created hard-to-treat "superbugs" that are spreading and growing stronger, with dire consequences, according to Consumer Reports, the world's largest and most trusted nonprofit consumer organization. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that the unrestrained use of antibiotics sickens at least 2.25 million Americans each year and kills another 37,000 people.

"The Rise of Superbugs" is featured on ConsumerReports.org/superbugs and in the August issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is the first report in a three-part investigative series focused on America's antibiotic crisis.  This introductory piece explains how the overuse and misuse of antibiotics is leading to the strengthening and spread of dangerous infections that are becoming resistant to these drugs.  For example, resistant bacteria like MRSA were once confined to hospitals, but have now spread to otherwise healthy people in the community.

The remaining installments will examine the presence of superbugs in America's hospitals and the role antibiotics play in the U.S. meat supply.

"The emergence of antibiotic-resistant superbugs is a major threat to the health and well-being of millions of Americans," said Lisa Gill, prescription drugs editor, Consumer Reports. "The problem is fixable, but we must act quickly and work together to change our behaviors to preserve the effectiveness of these life-saving drugs."

A new nationally representative survey from Consumer Reports shows poor awareness among Americans about antibiotic resistance and widespread misinformation about its causes, with 41 percent of adults saying they are unaware of antibiotic resistance.

In addition, the overuse of antibiotics can kill "good" bacteria, leaving people susceptible to other difficult-to-treat bacterial infections, like C. difficile.

Officials from the CDC, World Health Organization, and European Union have all sounded the alarm, calling the rise of resistant bacteria one of the world's most serious health crises.

Consumer Reports says the crisis is compounded because the pipeline for new antibiotics has slowed to a trickle, with many broad-spectrum antibiotics introduced some 30 years ago. "We absolutely need new antibiotics," said Lisa McGiffert, director of Consumer Reports' Safe Patient Project.  "But we have to make sure that we don't lower the bar on standards for drug approval and that all new antibiotics have met pre-market assessments for safety and efficacy."

Consumer Reports recommends specific steps for reducing the use of antibiotics and curbing the development of drug-resistant bacteria, including:

  • Patients should think twice about the need for antibiotics and should not ask doctors to prescribe them. Consumer Reports' survey found that one out of every five people who had received a prescription for an antibiotic in the last year said they had asked their health practitioner to write it.  

  • Doctors and dentists must stop over-prescribing antibiotics when they aren't absolutely necessary. The CDC estimates that up to half of all antibiotic prescriptions are written for inappropriate uses, or for things they don't work against, such as for colds and the flu.

  • Patients should request targeted drugs. When possible, your doctor should order cultures to identify the bacteria that caused your infection and prescribe a drug that targets that bug.

  • Doctors should reserve so-called "broad-spectrum" antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and levofloxacin for hard-to-treat infections. These drugs attack multiple bacteria types at once and are more likely to breed resistant bacteria and wipe out protective bacteria in the body.

  • Consumers should use antibiotic creams sparingly. Even antibiotics applied to the skin can lead to resistant bacteria.  Use over-the-counter ointments containing bacitracin and neomycin only if dirt remains after cleaning with soap and water.

  • Everyone should avoid infections in the first place. That means staying up to date on vaccinations. And it means washing hands thoroughly and regularly, especially before preparing or eating food, before and after treating a cut or wound, and after using the bathroom, sneezing, coughing, and handling garbage. Plain soap and water is best. Avoid antibacterial hand soaps and cleaners, which may promote resistance.

Consumer Reports is committed to help wipe out the antibiotic-resistant bacteria or "superbugs" through coordinating among all of the organization's broad resources and channels.

As part of this initiative, Consumer Reports will participate in this week's Spotlight Health, a segment of the Aspen Ideas Festival; Board Chair Diane Archer will moderate a panel on how to curb antibiotic overuse in the U.S. and around the world. And, earlier this month Consumer Reports' President and CEO Marta Tellado was invited to participate in the White House Forum on Antibiotic Stewardship.

In addition, Consumer Reports, through its participation in the Choosing Wisely initiative, is collaborating with seven U.S. healthcare organizations to focus on reducing the inappropriate use of antibiotics for viral infections by at least 20 percent within three years.

Consumers Reports has created a special page at ConsumerReports.org/superbugs featuring a wide range of information on superbugs and antibiotic resistance including videos, news articles, and social conversation. Consumers can follow the conversation on Twitter at #SlamSuperbugs.







Johns Hopkins: DNA Shed from Head and Neck Tumors Detected in Blood and Saliva

Posted on June 25, 2015

PUBLIC RELEASE: On the hunt for better cancer screening tests, Johns Hopkins scientists led a proof of principle study that successfully identified tumor DNA shed into the blood and saliva of 93 patients with head and neck cancer. A report on the findings is published in the June 24 issue of Science Translational Medicine

"We have shown that tumor DNA in the blood or saliva can successfully be measured for these cancers," says Nishant Agrawal, M.D., associate professor of otolaryngology -- head and neck surgery -- and of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "In our study, testing saliva seemed to be the best way to detect cancers in the oral cavity, and blood tests appeared to find more cancers in the larynx, hypopharynx and oropharynx. However, combining blood and saliva tests may offer the best chance of finding cancer in any of those regions."

Agrawal explains that inborn genetic predispositions for most head and neck cancers are rare, but other mutations that don't generally occur in normal cells have long been considered good targets for screening tests.

In the case of head and neck cancers associated with HPV -- tumors on the rise among Americans -- Agrawal and his colleagues searched patients' blood and saliva samples for certain tumor-promoting, HPV-related DNA. For non-HPV-related cancers, which account for the worldwide majority of head and neck tumors, they looked for mutations in cancer-related genes that included TP53, PIK3CA, CDKN2A, FBXW7, HRAS and NRAS.

The major risk factors for head and neck cancers are alcohol, tobacco -- including chewing tobacco -- and HPV infection.

For the study, 93 patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent head and neck cancer gave saliva samples, and 47 of them also donated blood samples before their treatment at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas. The scientists detected tumor DNA in the saliva of 71 of the 93 patients (76 percent) and in the blood of 41 of the 47 (87 percent). In the 47 who gave blood and saliva samples, scientists were able to detect tumor DNA in at least one of the body fluids in 45 of them (96 percent).

When the scientists analyzed how well their tumor DNA tests found cancers in certain regions of the head and neck, they found that saliva tests fared better than blood tests for oral cavity cancers. All 46 oral cavity cancers were correctly identified through saliva tests, compared with 16 of 34 oropharynx cancers (47 percent), seven of 10 larynx cancers (70 percent) and two of three hypopharynx cancers (67 percent).

The oral cavity refers to areas within the mouth, including the lips, front of the tongue, cheeks and gums. The oropharynx and hypopharynx are located in the back of the throat. The larynx, also in the throat, is typically known as the voice box.

"One reason that saliva tests may not have been as effective for cancer sites in the back of the throat is because we didn't ask patients to gargle; we only asked them to rinse their mouths to provide the samples," says Agrawal, a member of Johns Hopkins' Kimmel Cancer Center and Ludwig Center.

Blood tests correctly identified tumor DNA more often in 20 of 22 oropharynx cancers (91 percent), six of seven larynx cancers (86 percent) and all three hypopharynx cancers. Taken together, blood and saliva tests correctly identified all oral cavity, larynx and hypopharynx cancers and 20 of 22 oropharynx cancers (91 percent).

Agrawal says the sensitivity of the tests overall depended on the cancer site, stage and HPV status, ranging between 86 to 100 percent. He also reports that saliva tests performed better for early-stage cancers, finding all 20 cancers, compared with blood tests that correctly identified seven of 10. He and his team found the opposite was true for late-stage cancers: Blood tests found more late-stage cancers (34 of 37), compared with saliva tests (51 of 73). Blood tests also correctly identified HPV-related tumors, occurring in 30 of the 93 patients, more often than saliva tests, probably because HPV-related tumors tend to occur in the back of the throat, which may not have been reached with the saliva rinse.

"Our ultimate goal is to develop better screening tests to find head and neck cancers among the general population and improve how we monitor patients with cancer for recurrence of their disease," says Bert Vogelstein, M.D., the Clayton Professor of Oncology at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, co-director of the Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins and a co-author of the study.

The scientists caution that further study of their tumor DNA detection method in larger groups of patients and healthy people is needed before clinical effectiveness can be determined, and that refinements also may be needed in methods of collecting saliva and the range of cancer-specific genes in the gene test panel.

In addition, Agrawal says: "We don't yet have definitive data on false positive rates, and won't until there are more studies of the tests in healthy people." However, he notes, the formulas used to analyze their blood and saliva tests are designed to weed out questionable results.

False results in gene tests arise when DNA are copied many times, sequenced and analyzed. The scientists used a method they developed and tested previously in cervical fluid to find ovarian and cervical cancers. Specifically, they attach a kind of genetic bar code -- a random set of 14 DNA base pairs -- to trace each copied DNA fragment to its original one. DNA copies lacking the bar code are suspected to be an artifact of the process, and any mutation found in it is disregarded.

Agrawal says that tests like the one his team used, if used commercially, likely would cost several hundred dollars, and "our long-term goal is to create a test that costs less than $50 so it can be administered by physicians or dentists."

To screen for head and neck cancers, which occur in more than 50,000 people in the U.S. each year, doctors conduct physical examinations. Biopsies are taken of suspicious-looking lesions, but "this method is not ideal, as evidenced by the fact that most head and neck cancers are rarely found at very early stages, when they are most curable," says Agrawal.

###

Funding for the study was provided by Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Fund for Cancer Research, the Conrad R. Hilton Foundation, the Banyan Gate Foundation, Swim Across America, the Sol Goldman Sequencing Facility at Johns Hopkins, the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute (CA43460, CA057345, CA152753) and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (DE019032).

Scientists contributing to the research include Yuxuan Wang, Simeon Springer, Carolyn L. Mulvey, Natalie Silliman, Joy Schaefer, Mark Sausen, Nathan James, Eleni M. Rettig, Theresa Guo, Justin A. Bishop, Christine H. Chung, Joseph A. Califano, David W. Eisele, Carole Fakhry, Christine G. Gourin, Patrick K. Ha, Hyunseok Kang, Ana Kiess, Wayne M. Koch, Harry Quon, Jeremy D. Richmon, David Sidransky, Ralph P. Tufano, William H. Westra, Chetan Bettegowda, Luis A. Diaz Jr., Nickolas Papadopoulos and Kenneth W. Kinzler from Johns Hopkins; and Curtis R. Pickering and Jeffrey N. Myers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Under agreements between The Johns Hopkins University, Genzyme, Sysmex Inostics, Qiagen, Invitrogen, and Personal Genome Diagnostics, Diaz, Papadopolous, Vogelstein, and Kinzler are entitled to a share of the royalties received by the university on sales of products related to genes and technologies described in this manuscript. Diaz, Papadopolous, Vogelstein and Kinzler are co-founders of Sysmex Inostics and Personal Genome Diagnostics, and are members of their scientific advisory boards and own Personal Genome Diagnostics stock, which is subject to certain restrictions under Johns Hopkins University policy. The terms of these arrangements are managed by The Johns Hopkins University in accordance with its conflict-of-interest policies. Papadopolous is affiliated with PapGene Inc., and Vogelstein with PapGene Inc. and Morphotek Inc., and James with the Emmes Corporation.







Wearable Compliance Measurement Receives FDA Clearance

Posted on June 25, 2015

KANATA, Ontario, June 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- BRAEBON Medical Corporation announces today that the DentiTrac® oral appliance compliance system has passed a substantial regulatory hurdle and is now FDA cleared in the USA for use with the SomnoDent oral device.  BRAEBON congratulates SomnoMed for being the first company in the world to achieve this milestone.

The DentiTrac® system has been developed by BRAEBON.  It is a wearable micro-recorder and web cloud portal combination which defines the new gold standard for the objective measurement of oral appliance compliance measurement for sleep apnea.  DentiTrac® is an integrated wearable micro-recorder embedded inside an oral appliance to reliably and accurately gather detailed information to confirm a patient is following prescribed therapy.  The information is then uploaded to the BRAEBON cloud portal where dental and medical specialists can conveniently and securely review patient information and assess sleep apnea therapy adherence.

"We are very pleased DentiTrac® is launching in the US market.  Accurate oral appliance compliance measurement is needed to level the playing field with traditional sleep apnea treatment called CPAP.  In addition, the ability to reliably measure sleep apnea treatment adherence is a vital requirement for insurance payers.  Continuous Open Airway Therapy (COAT™) is the number one alternative to CPAP and we anticipate this will contribute to significant overall growth in the burgeoning field of dental sleep medicine and the use of oral appliance therapy for sleep apnea.  The DentiTrac® is the final realization of our Test Treat Trac strategy which empowers clinicians across multiple disciplines to efficiently and collaboratively work together to more effectively manage the sleep apnea patient," said Dr. Richard Bonato, CEO and Co-Founder.

"The challenge was to develop a measurement technology which could not be easily deceived. This was vital because new US Federal DOT legislation will impact everyone in the transportation industry including all truck drivers, pilots, bus drivers, etc.  We had to invent a novel and powerful solution which we've secured with IP patent protection.  The level of product sophistication connected with our cloud portal is beyond anything we've done before.  I'm very proud of what our team has accomplished," saidDonald Bradley, CTO and Co-Founder.

BRAEBON has an agreement in place with SomnoMed Limited as the preferred worldwide dorsal fin oral appliance design and for exclusive distribution in the EU and parts of Australasia.  At this time, the BRAEBON DentiTrac compliance system is only available from SomnoMed in the USA.







Zimmer, Biomet Complete Merger

Posted on June 24, 2015

WARSAW, Ind. -- Zimmer Holdings, Inc. announced that, following the receipt of U.S. Federal Trade Commission clearance, Zimmer has completed the acquisition of Biomet in a cash and equity transaction currently valued at approximately $14.0 billion. In connection with the combination, Zimmer has changed its corporate name to Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. The company will trade on the New York Stock Exchange and the SIX Swiss Exchange under the ticker symbol ZBH beginning June 29, 2015.

"The coming together of Zimmer and Biomet is a momentous achievement. We are excited to move forward as one company and to pursue new opportunities that benefit patients, healthcare professionals and employees around the globe," said David Dvorak, President and CEO of Zimmer Biomet. "Over the past several months, our integration planning teams have been working to ensure that we capture the best of both companies and create a seamless and efficient transition. I look forward to continuing to work closely with our employees for the benefit of all of our stakeholders."

Strategic Fit

Zimmer Biomet will be a leading innovator in the $45 billion musculoskeletal healthcare market, committed to creating innovative solutions for the evolving global healthcare industry. The company will offer a comprehensive and diversified portfolio of musculoskeletal solutions. The scale of Zimmer Biomet will provide for increased competitiveness in core franchises and a stronger presence in emerging markets. Zimmer Biomet also expects to create operational synergies that will enhance value for stockholders.

New Branding

The company unveiled its new logo, which was designed to utilize the visual components of both the legacy Zimmer and Biomet brands.

Dvorak continued, "Each of our companies has a proud heritage. Just as the Zimmer Biomet name leverages the strong brand equity of both companies, the company logo combines Zimmer's iconic symbol with elements of Biomet's corporate identity."

Additionally, the company unveiled its new tagline, "Your progress. Our promise.", which underscores its longstanding commitment to helping people live better lives.

Innovative Solutions

With substantial investments in research and development, a deep commitment to medical training and education, a highly experienced and knowledgeable global team, and a collaborative, personalized approach to working with healthcare professionals, the company will develop and introduce cutting edge musculoskeletal products and services designed to achieve exceptional patient outcomes. Zimmer Biomet's expanded sales force will also be increasingly effective in all geographies by having access to a broader portfolio.

Value for Stockholders

The transaction is expected to be double-digit accretive to the company's adjusted earnings per share in the first year following today's closing. Zimmer Biomet also expects to achieve net annual synergies of approximately $350 million by the third year following closing, with approximately $135 million anticipated in the first 12 months. The company anticipates leveraging its scalable platforms and achieving cross-selling opportunities.

Updated Financial Guidance

Zimmer Biomet estimates second quarter 2015 constant currency revenue growth, excluding Biomet acquired revenue, to be in a range of 1.0% to 1.5%, or 1.5% to 2.0% on a billing day, constant currency basis. Full-year 2015 constant currency revenue compared to pro forma 2014 revenues is now expected to increase between 1.5% and 2.0%. Previously, the company had estimated full-year constant currency revenue would increase between 1.5% and 2.5% over 2014 pro forma revenues. The pro forma adjustments to the prior year reflect the inclusion of Biomet revenue for the comparable post-merger closing period in the prior year and the impact of the previously announced divestiture remedies.

Additionally, Zimmer Biomet estimates second quarter 2015 adjusted, fully diluted earnings per share to be in a range of $1.55 to $1.58 and reaffirms its adjusted full year, fully diluted earnings per share range estimate of $6.60 to $6.80. The company will provide further financial information on the transaction and expectations for the balance of fiscal 2015 when it hosts its second quarter earnings conference call scheduled for July 30, 2015.

Expanded Board of Directors

As of the merger closing, the size of the company's Board of Directors has been increased to 12 members. Effective immediately, Michael W. Michelson, Member, Private Equity, KKR, and Jeffrey K. Rhodes, Partner, TPG, have been appointed to the Board. Messrs. Michelson and Rhodes previously served as members of the board of directors of Biomet. Michelson joined KKR in 1981 and has played a significant role investing in and developing the firms' portfolio companies. Rhodes joined TPG in 2005 and is a leader of the firm's investment activities in the healthcare services, pharmaceutical and medical device sectors.

"Mike Michelson and Jeff Rhodes bring a wealth of healthcare industry experience to Zimmer Biomet's Board of Directors," said Larry Glasscock, Chairman of the Board. "We welcome them to the Board and look forward to their contributions."







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